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Does Your Password Make the Bad Password List?

Jackie here. Do you have a bad password? The annual round-up of most common passwords by SplashData is out, and unfortunately the list is filled with poor password choices. Do you see your password on the list? If you do, it’s time for a change. Creating a strong password is an essential way to protect your online accounts and your personal information.

  1. 123456
  2. password
  3. 12345678
  4. qwerty
  5. 12345
  6. 123456789
  7. football
  8. 1234
  9. 1234567
  10. baseball

Notice a trend? People love using sequential combinations of numbers (like 1234), but this isn’t a wise password choice. It’s just too easy to guess. Rather than using numbers in order, try mixing things up and interspersing random numbers with letters. A string of numbers could be a great addition at the end of an already unique password to make it more secure, but they aren’t a strong choice on their own.

The word “password” is another popular choice, but it’s also an insecure one. This password consistently ranks near the top of the most common passwords and it likely an easy guess for hackers, thieves, and others wanting to gain unauthorized access to your accounts. Skip singular words from the dictionary; they are just too easy to crack.

The Good News

The top 10 passwords of 2015 weren’t strong ones, but we do see people moving in the right direction. This year’s passwords are getting longer, an important key to a secure account. However, we all need to remember that longer doesn’t always mean stronger. If you’re using common patterns or words, longer is just longer. Don’t focus on longer passwords, but rather more secure ones.

Check out the rest of the top 25 most common passwords and find more tips for creating a strong one here.

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